Events for: Years

Thursday
8/12
2010
11:00 am

A Magic Show for Young and Never too Young “Bonaparte”

Do you believe in magic? Bonaparte will make a believer out of you with his dazzling, interactive style of magic. This award-winning entertainer astounds and amazes audiences of all ages with his unique blend of magic, comedy, origami, balloon sculpture and much, much more.
Sunday
8/29
2010
4:00 pm

The New England Shakespeare Festival “Twelfe Night”

The New England Shakespeare Festival brings its production of Twelfth Night to our park! Originally titled "Twelfe Night, or what you will," Shakespeare's madcap comedy of music and revelry, mistaken identity, outlandish characters, and the "verie Midsommer madnesse" of love is one of his most beloved works.
Thursday
9/23
2010
7:00 pm

Paula Koppel “Adding Years to Your Life and Life to Your Years”

Paula Koppel, a geriatric nurse for more than 25 years, will discuss what is currently known about the biology of aging, including the impact of genetics. The discussion will include how specific lifestyle habits can biologically slow down the aging process and prevent disability.
Saturday
10/2
2010
1:00 pm

Dennis McNally “Jack Kerouac and the American Bohemian Tradition

Dennis McNally received his Ph.D. in American History from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst in 1977 for a biography of Jack Kerouac, which was then published by Random House in 1979 under the title Desolate Angel: Jack Kerouac, The Beat Generation, and America. Having been selected as The Grateful Dead's authorized biographer in 1980, he became the band's publicist in 1984. In 2002 he published A Long Strange Trip; The Inside History of the Grateful Dead with Broadway Books, which achieved the New York Times Best Seller list. Dennis is working on a book about the American bohemian tradition from Thoreau through Mark Twain and thence to Bob Dylan.
Sunday
10/3
2010
12:00 pm

Michael Pierson, Assoc. Prof., UMass Lowell Dept. of History “Prelude to the Civil War: The State of the Union 150 Years Ago”

It took less than a year for the United States of America to fall apart. In April 1860, the Democratic Party met in Charleston, South Carolina, to select a candidate for the U.S. Presidency. By April 1861, Charlestonians saw a vastly different spectacle: a new country, the Confederate States of America, opened fire on the U.S. flag. Only weeks later, Massachusetts troops had to force their way through Baltimore, at the cost of several lives, including Lowell's own Luther Ladd and Addison Whitney, to save the nation's capitol from capture. This talk will chart this year of turmoil in order to understand what pushed Lowell residents and others to the brink of civil war.
Thursday
10/7
2010
7:00 pm

Justin Locke “The Principles of Applied Stupidity”

Justin Locke takes an amusing look at the amazing power of "dumb luck," "fool's courage," and the surprising discovery that doing things completely counter to the standard conventional wisdom can be the most effective way of achieving astonishing results. The less you know the more you learn. Who knew?
Monday
10/18
2010
12:00 pm

Eric S. Rosengren President & Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

An economist by training, he joined the Bank in 1985 as a member of the research department. In his research Rosengren has made significant contributions in the fields of banking and monetary policy. A focus of his research has been on how financial problems can impact the real economy. This program is the first of four "Lunchtime Lectures at the Inn & Conference Center" included in the Parker Lectures schedule for 2010-11. The community series is co-sponsored by the Parker Lectures Committee, UMass Lowell Center for Arts and Ideas, and Middlesex Community College. A complimentary buffet lunch is included, but reservations are required and seating is limited to 100. The program begins promptly at 12 noon. To reserve a seat, contact paul_marion@uml.edu or call 978-934-3107
Wednesday
10/20
2010
7:00 pm

Concert: Aaron Larget-Caplan “Bach, Dance and Sleep”

Guitarist Aaron Larget-Caplan performs exotic dances, tangos, and serenades by Isaac Albeniz (Spain) and Astor Piazzolla (Argentina), New Lullabies by New England composers, and a prelude and fugue or two by Bach.
Saturday
10/23
2010
1:00 pm

Family Concert: Aaron Larget-Caplan “Spirit of Spain”

Join Aaron on a tour of Spanish history, geography, language and poetry through Spanish classical and flamenco music. Lively stories, dialogue, guitar techniques and musical interactions introduce 400 years of classical music from exotic Spain and Latin America. Ole!
Sunday
10/24
2010
2:00 pm

Ben Z. Rose “John Stark, Maverick General”

John Stark's immortal words "Live Free or Die. Death is not the worst of evils" ring throughout New England and especially in New Hampshire where John Stark lived until the age of 94. Born in Londonderry in 1728, General Stark was known for his strong opinions, battlefield strategies and leadership capabilities honed during the French and Indian War when Stark was a member of Roger's Rangers.
Sunday
11/7
2010
2:00 pm

Kenneth M. Tingle “The Girl in the Italian Bakery”

Life didn't do Kenny Tingle any favors. In The Girl in the Italian Bakery, follow his journey from childhood in a tough housing project in Lawrence Massachusetts, to his introduction to crime and the years he spent in foster homes. Although he never has trouble meeting girls, the one girl he longs for always seems out of reach. The Girl in the Italian Bakery is the remarkably true story of always keeping hope, even when there is little left to hope for.
Monday
11/8
2010
12:00 pm

Dean Baker “Recovering from the Bubble Economy”

Dean Baker is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington, D.C. He is frequently cited in economics reporting in major media outlets. He writes a weekly column for the Guardian Limited (UK) and his blog, Beat the Press, features commentary on economic reporting. His latest book, Taking Economics Seriously, thinks through what we might gain if we took the ideological blinders off of basic economic principles, False Profits. This is one of this season's "Lunchtime Lectures at the Inn & Conference Center." See October 18 program note above for details about reserving a seat for the lecture and lunch.
Thursday
11/18
2010
7:00 pm

Mish Michaels “Storm Chasing”

Mish Michaels is an Emmy Award winning broadcast meteorologist and environmental reporter. When Mish was in kindergarten, an F2 tornado ripped through her apartment complex just outside of Baltimore, Maryland. It is her earliest childhood memory, and she's been searching the skies ever since. Mish has been affiliated with the Meteorology Department at UMass Lowell for over a decade, where she has taught a course called "Meteorological Communications." Rescheduled from last year.
Monday
3/28
2011
12:00 pm

Margaret Knight, Asst. Prof., UMass Lowell Dept. of Nursing “Diversity in Health Care”

Health care will continue to be a "hot topic" over the next several decades. As the U.S. demographics continue to shift, providing culturally competent health care becomes critical in order to decrease health disparities, improve access to care and decrease the financial burden associated with illness care. Yet, the current healthcare work- force does not adequately represent the ethnic and cultural diversity of the country. Programs focused on the recruitment and retention of diverse individuals in college and university health related programs are greatly needed.

This is one of this season's "Lunchtime Lectures at the Inn & Conference Center." See October 18 program note above for details about reserving a seat for the lecture and lunch.

Sunday
4/3
2011
2:00 pm

Tom Sexton “I Think Again of Those Ancient Chinese Poets”

Tom Sexton, a Lowell High graduate and Alumni Hall of Famer and former Poet Laureate of Alaska, will read from his work in progress, The Final Chapter, which is a collection of sonnets about growing up in Lowell in the 1940s and 50s. He will also read from his new book, I Think Again of Those Ancient Chinese Poets, a collection of eight-line poems, and discuss the craft of poetry.
Sunday
4/10
2011
2:00 pm

J. Dennis Robinson “The Super Big Story of America’s Smallest Seacoast”

Squashed between Maine and Massachusetts, New Hampshire claims just 17 measly miles of coastline. It has only one port. So how come Portsmouth, N.H. (population 20,000), is widely considered one of America's top heritage destinations today? Award-winning author J. Dennis Robinson rockets you through 400 years of New Hampshire seacoast history with attitude. Before Lexington and Concord, for example, Paul Revere took his first ride to Portsmouth, N.H. And who saved the Pilgrims from starving in 1623? That's right, a guy from New Hampshire. Forget what you learned in school, Robinson says, because this stuff wasn't in your textbook but it's all true.
Monday
4/25
2011
12:00 pm

Regina Panasuk, Prof., UMass Lowell Graduate School of Education “Transforming Learning with Technology: Reality and Controversy”

It's hard to talk about changing education, never mind transforming it. Education is, after all, the one institution to which we entrust our children for the larger part of a day. Discussions about changing education run the gamut of emotions, raise tensions and reveal deeply held beliefs whether accurate or not. This is one of this season's "Lunchtime Lectures at the Inn & Conference Center." See October 18 program note above for details about reserving a seat for the lecture and lunch.
Saturday
4/30
2011
7:00 pm

Angkor Dance Troup, New England Orchestra & the Lowell Youth Orchestra “Where East Meets West: Cultural Fusion in Music and Dance”

The concert centers around the fascinating music of Cambodian-American composer Chinary Ung, while the Angkor Dancers explore a mix of court and folk dance in which monkeys court mermaids and giants battle divine princes. Conducted by Kay G. Roberts, Prof., UMass Lowell Dept. of Music.
Thursday
8/11
2011
11:00 am

“The Jim Show”

Armed with nothing more than a trunkful of props, Jim performs amazing feats of skill. The Jim Show is guaranteed to amaze and amuse the entire family. When attempting the impossible, things can go wrong, and in the Jim Show, they often do, yet Jim displays an intriguing self confidence that keeps audiences glued to every performance.
Sunday
8/14
2011
4:00 pm

The New England Shakespeare Festival “Measure for Measure”

Shakespeare's sublimely dark comedy! A classic morality tale on the themes of human frailty, sin, and hypocrisy, the play blends comic contradictions and ambiguities with biting social commentary. Join us for this humorous exploration of blind justice, mercy, and the tension between good and evil that resides within every human soul.
Thursday
9/22
2011
7:00 pm

Chaim M. Rosenberg “The Life and Times of Francis Cabot Lowell”

Chaim M. Rosenberg is the author of “The Life and Times of Francis Cabot Lowell: 1775 – 1817.” He has combed the archives to tell the story of this great man who helped bring about the American Industrial Revolution. The city of Lowell Massachusetts is named in his honor.
Sunday
9/25
2011
2:00 pm

Mark Pendergrast “Inside the Outbreaks: The Elite Medical Detectives of the Epidemic Intelligence Service”

Mark Pendergrast takes readers on a riveting journey through the history of this remarkable organization, following EIS officers on their globetrotting quest to eliminate the most lethal and widespread threats to the world’s health. Over the years they have successfully battled polio, cholera, and smallpox, and in recent years have turned to the epidemics killing us now — smoking, obesity, and violence among them.
Monday
10/3
2011
12:00 pm

Karl (Chip) Case “The Housing Market and the Macro Economy”

Karl “Chip” Case, Professor Emeritus of Economics, Wellesley College, and co-author of the Case-Shiller Index, the leading measure of home prices in the US. He is the author of five books, including “Principles of Economics” and “Property Tax: The Need for Reform.” He serves on the boards of directors of the Mortgage Guarantee Insurance Corp. and Depositors Insurance Fund of Mass. and on the Advisory Board of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. He is a Senior Fellow at the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University. This program is the first of three “Lunchtime Lectures at the Inn & Conference Center.”  This series is co-sponsored and presented by The Parker Lectures Committee, UMass Lowell Center for Arts and Ideas, Middlesex Community College, and UMass Lowell Prof. Bill Mass. A complimentary buffet lunch is included, but reservations are required and seating is limited. The program begins promptly at 12 noon. To reserve a seat, contact artsandideas@uml.edu or call 978-934-3107.
Saturday
10/8
2011
1:30 pm

Todd Tietchen “Kerouac Today: A Reflection on Nature and Technology”

Dr. Tietchen is a member of the UMass Lowell English Department. He holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Washington. He was formerly an Assistant Professor of English at Union County College in Cranford, New Jersey. He is also the author of "The Cubalogues: The Beat Writers in Revolutionary Cuba."
Thursday
10/20
2011
7:00 pm

Steve Collins “Shake-Scene”

Who had more effect on the English language than William Shakespeare? He created over 1700 common words that before him were either used in a new manner or didn't exist at all.  Stephen Collins makes Shakespeare's words come alive. Shakespeare's tragedies, comedies, histories, and Sonnets are all represented in this exciting show.
Sunday
10/23
2011
2:00 pm

Neil Miller “Banned In Boston”

The author of “Banned in Boston: The Watch and Ward Society’s Crusade Against Books, Burlesque, and the Social Evil” will talk about the group that banned books, closed down theaters and burlesque houses, and extended Massachusetts’s puritan heritage into the 1940’s and 50’s.
Sunday
10/30
2011
2:00 pm

The Tamburitzans of Duquesne University

America's longest-running multicultural song and dance company, the Duquesne University Tamburitzans, is a unique ensemble of talented young folk artists dedicated to the performance and preservation of the music, songs, and dances of Eastern Europe and neighboring folk cultures.
Tuesday
11/1
2011
7:00 pm

Joe Manning “The Lewis Hine Project: Tracking down the Lives of Child Laborers”

“Whatever happened to that child worker?” Motivated by this question, Joe Manning has identified some of the more than 5,000 child laborers photographed in the early 1900s by Lewis Hine, and has tracked down and interviewed their descendants. Manning will show some of Hine’s historic photographs, tell the stories of the children in them, and talk about the exciting process of searching for descendants, most of whom were not aware of the pictures of their parents and grandparents A 20th Anniversary Series offering of the Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of Lowell National Historical Park and the UMass Lowell Graduate School of Education.
Monday
11/7
2011
12:00 pm

“What to Look for in the 2012 Presidential Primaries”

UMass Lowell Chancellor Marty Meehan will moderate a panel discussion with notable experts from the worlds of media and politics as they look at the field of presidential candidates, the upcoming primaries and caucuses, and national context for the 2012 election. Chancellor Meehan represented the Fifth Congressional District of Massachusetts in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1993 to 2007. He served on the House Armed Services and Judiciary committees. Widely respected as a reformer, he established a national reputation for his legislative leadership in reforming campaign finance laws and protecting people against the health risks in tobacco use. This program is the second of three “Lunchtime Lectures at the Inn & Conference Center.” This series is co-sponsored and presented by The Parker Lecture Committee, UMass Lowell Center for Arts and Ideas, Middlesex Community College, and UMass Lowell Prof. Bill Mass. A complimentary buffet lunch is included, but reservations are required and seating is limited. The program begins promptly at 12 noon. To reserve a seat, contact artsandideas@uml.edu or call 978-934-3107.
Thursday
11/17
2011
7:00 pm

R.P.HALE “The 2012 Fraud: Misreading the Maya and Their Calendars”

Explore the history of the Apocalypse, mankind’s second oldest story, along with what the Mayan calendars are and how they work. R.P. Hale is of Aztec heritage, an astronomer, musician, calligrapher, and chemist. In 1999, the Smithsonian Institution recognized R.P. Hale as one of the top musical instrument makers in the United States.
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Sunday
3/19
2023
2:00 pm

Michelle Marchetti Coughlin – “The Complex Worlds of Colonial Women”

What was life really like for women in early New England? The answer may surprise you. Historian/author Michelle Marchetti Coughlin (One Colonial Woman's World: The Life and Writings of Mehetabel Chandler Coit, Penelope Winslow: Plymouth Colony First Lady: Re-Imagining a Life) will explore not only the many challenges and constraints women faced, but also the opportunities they embraced and the important roles they played in their communities. She will also address the unique experiences of Native and African-American women.
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Saturday
4/8
2023
12:00 pm

Dennis DiZoglio – “The Value of Political Capital”

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be a mayor? Well after serving three terms as a mayor and being a local and regional government official for over thirty-five years I think I know. So I wrote this book to pull the curtain back just enough to let you peak in and know as well. and how public engagement can be a full contact sport. It is a fascinating life with funny memories and memorable events that leads to a rewarding life.
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Thursday
4/13
2023
6:00 pm

James H. Barron – “The Greek Connection: The Life of Elias Demetracopoulos and the Untold Story of Watergate”

“The Greek Connection: The Life of Elias Demetracopoulos and the Untold Story of Watergate” is the internationally acclaimed biography of a controversial journalist and freedom fighter who relentlessly battled for democracy, honor and survival against abusive Greek and American governments trying to destroy him. There are Greater Lowell and Massachusetts elements to the saga, which includes the first-ever detailed profile of Greek-American tycoon Tom Pappas. This compelling narrative sheds new light on historic 20th century events. Doris Kearns Goodwin called it “a magnificent work.” The Washington Post described it as “cinematic.” Author James H. Barron is a Massachusetts attorney, journalist, university lecturer, and a founding board member of the New England Center for Investigative Reporting. For more information check out thegreekconnectionbook.com.
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Saturday
4/29
2023
2:00 pm

Paul Marion – “Lockdown Letters & Union River”

Paul Marion has been a writer and community activist since the 1970s. He is the author of several collections of poetry as well as the editor of the early writings of Jack Kerouac, Atop an Underwood, and other titles. His recent book, Lockdown Letters & Other Poems, begins with the Covid pandemic and expands to subjects like travel, Space, and sports. His Union River: Poems and Sketches (2017), spans 40 years of work and offers a lyrical Americana address for our dramatic time. Among other accomplishments on the community front, he co-founded the Lowell Folk Festival and Lowell Heritage Partnership, an alliance of people and organizations whose mission is to care for architecture, nature, and culture.