Events for: New England Quilt Museum

Saturday
Mar
25
11:00 am

Lynne Zacek Bassett – “Gothic to Goth: Romantic Era Fashion and its Legacy”

_0004_lynneThe Romantic aesthetic of the 1810 -1860 period embraced the imagination – combining history, nature, religion, and terror into a fascinating mélange expressed in the clothing of the era and influencing fashion design to the present day. The Romantic Movement rejected Enlightenment reason, and embraced instead the imagination and the unknown. Costume of the early 19th century integrates the elements of history, imagination, religion, and even landscape central to the Romantic sensibility. Lynne Z. Bassett examines these influences on women’s clothing from 1810 – 1860, alongside fine and decorative arts of the period and how Romanticism forms the roots of today’s Goth and Steampunk fashion movements.

Saturday
Nov
4
11:00 am

Astrida Schaeffer – “The Sexual Politics of Women’s Fashion in the 19th Century”

schaefferIn our contemporary world of stretchy fabrics and loosely cut clothes, the idea of wearing corsets, hoops, bustles, and hip pads, seems uncomfortable and restrictive. Old photos of tiny waists and tight fitting dresses in museum exhibits look so extreme to modern-day women. How could they function? Weren’t they confined by their clothes? The real story is much more complex. Women had led active full lives for hundreds of years, taking advantage of fashion’s changing shapes to construct their own social identities. Yet by the end of the nineteenth century, with the rise of the women’s suffrage movement and women in the work force leading more independent lives, the corset and the closely-tailored clothes worn over it became symbols of oppression. This talk by clothing historian Astrida Schaeffer explores how women’s clothing went from fashion statement to political statement.

Saturday
Sep
8
11:00 am

Matt W. Miller “The Wounded for the Water”

mattmillerBorn and raised in Lowell, award-winning author Matt W. Miller will share his newly published collection of poetry, The Wounded for the Water. “In these lyrical meditations, we are witness to our own drowning in family and history, in politics and love. We are dragged across reefs and pounded into the shore, realizing ultimately that the only way to avoid drowning is to embrace the maelstrom and breathe in the water.” Following the author’s reading and discussion, participants can explore the works in H₂Oh!–Vital, Powerful, Sacred Water. This exhibition encouraged quilt and textile artists to interpret one of the most vital resources on earth in their own unique individual style, whether abstract, graphic, or representational.